Dissertation Scholars

2017-18 Dissertation Fellowship Application

2016-2017 Dissertation Scholars

SA Smythe

Department of Black Studies
South Hall 3702
University of California, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3150

sasmythe@blackstudies.ucsb.edu

SA Smythe is a finishing doctoral candidate in History of Consciousness at UC Santa Cruz with designated emphases in Literature and Feminist Studies. Their dissertation, L’Italia Meticcia: Being and Belonging in the Black Mediterranean, is a ​transdisciplinary project engaging with Italian literary studies, post​colonial ​studies, Black British ​and Caribbean ​cultural studies, queer studies, and critical human geography. This work examines the legal, literary, and historiographical aporias in the narration of italianità in the Black Mediterranean from the Risorgimento to the present by meditating on canonicity and citizenship in the wake of Europe’s self-initiated “crises” of migration and the attendant levels of dispossession. SA is currently president of the Queer Studies Caucus of the American Association of Italian Studies (AAIS), publishing editor of THEM – Trans Literary Journal, former contributing curator/writer at okayafrica and Reviews Editor for Critical Contemporary Culture Journal at the London School of Economics. SA is also a poet and an activist who performs and organises in queer trans Black and abolitionist poetry collectives in the Bay Area, London, and Berlin.

 

Vanessa Eileen Thompson

Department of Black Studies
South Hall 3702
University of California, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3150

vthompson@blackstudies.ucsb.edu

Vanessa Eileen Thompson is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Social Sciences at Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany.  Her research and teaching are concerned with black political and feminist theory, with a focus on Black Europe, black social movements, feminist decolonial/post-colonial theories and race critical theories.

In her dissertation project, entitled Solidarities in Black: Anti-Black Racism and the Struggle beyond Recognition in Paris, she explores forms of black urban activism and black cultural politics in France, thereby elucidating how abstract universalism fosters the re-production of colonial gendering and racialization processes. 

She has written articles on black social movements and racism in France, the relation between post-colonial power and recognition politics, and racial profiling and policing in Europe.

 

2015-2016 Dissertation Scholars

Billy Hall William (Billy) Hall

Department of Black Studies
South Hall 3702
University of California, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3150

billyhall@blackstudies.ucsb.edu

Billy Hall is a PhD Candidate in Global & Sociocultural Studies at Florida International University. His dissertation research uses a geohistorical lens to examine the transformation of food environments in Miami, tracing the role of black-owned food businesses from Jim Crow to urban renewal and into the present moment of community redevelopment. This research intervenes into popular and academic debates surrounding the widespread prevalence of food insecurity and diet-related disease in black communities, situating questions of food justice within a broad historical context of persisting black dispossession since slavery and Reconstruction. His work brings into conversation and contributes to urban theory, critical food studies, and the growing field of black geographies.

Billy grew up in Miami, likes playing music, and is thrilled to spend a year writing in the Department of Black Studies at UCSB.
 

Maria Maria Fernanda Escallon

Department of Black Studies
South Hall 3702
University of California, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3150

mescallon@blackstudies.ucsb.edu

Maria Fernanda is a doctoral candidate at Stanford University in the Department of Anthropology. She is originally from Bogotá, Colombia where she earned a B.A in Anthropology and a Master of Arts in Archaeology from the Universidad de Los Andes. She has worked in sustainable development and heritage policy creation for non-governmental organizations and Colombian public entities such as the Ministry and the Secretary of Culture. She did her ethnographic fieldwork in two communities of African descent declared as National and World Heritage in Colombia and Brazil, and traced the effects that such declarations had locally. She examines how and why Afro-descendant heritage became a critical instrument to recognize cultural diversity in these countries.  Her research argues that while heritage is called on to celebrate cultural diversity and inclusiveness, it has simultaneously helped to institutionalize the political and economic marginalization of Afro-descendant communities in Colombia and Brazil. Her dissertation, Exclusion in the Era of Multicultural Recognition: Cultural Heritage, Afro-Descendants, and the Politics of Diversity in Colombia and Brazil traces the local emergence of elitism, the exacerbation of economic inequality, and the entrenchment of social exclusion within these groups as a result of the heritage declaration. Ultimately, she evaluates if heritage proclamations are useful instruments to attend to broader issues of economic inequality and political rights for minorities.

 

2014-2015 Dissertation Scholars

Tracy Locke

Department of Black Studies
South Hall 3702
University of California, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3150

Tracy Locke is a doctoral candidate in the Social and Political Thought Program at York University, specializing in Black Studies and Health Studies. Drawing on her background in Political Theory and Urban Studies she brings an interdisciplinary approach to her work on the Black Diaspora.

Her dissertation examines black and black women’s health and well-being through a black feminist lens that brings American and Canadian analyses into closer conversation with each other.  With this diasporic approach she endeavours to contribute to the critical engagements of black and black women’s health within and across these national borders.

She is grateful for the opportunity to participate in the academic life in the Department of Black Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Krystal Smalls

Department of Black Studies
South Hall 3702
University of California, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3150 

I am a Ph.D. candidate in Africana Studies and Educational Linguistics at the University of Pennsylvania. I received my B.S. in Industrial and Labor Relations from Cornell University and studied Cultural Anthropology at the New School for Social Research. My work is transdisciplinary (spanning Africana/Black Studies; linguistic and visual anthropology, and education) and she has conducted research in Philadelphia, Nairobi, Monrovia and in her own community, the Gullah-Geechee lowcountry of South Carolina. My current project focuses on the racialization processes of transnational young people from Liberia and looks at how they use hip hop and other kinds of "youth culture" to produce a complex semiosis of blacknesses, transnational subjectivities, and new possible futures under the specters of anti-black racism, settler (post)colonialism, and neoliberalism. I also examine social media as a vital space for self-making (focusing on mass-mediated autobiographic images, or "selfies," and the emergence of digital personhood).

2013-2014 Dissertation Scholars

James Cantres

Department of Black Studies
South Hall 3702
University of California, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3150 
jcantres@blackstudies.ucsb.edu

James G. Cantres is a doctoral candidate in the Department of History at New York University specializing in the African Diaspora. Currently, he is Dissertation Fellow at UC Santa Barbara. His dissertation, "Migrants in the Metropole: Patterns of Caribbean Identification in Post-War London,1948-68" explores notions of belonging and alienation among migrant populations in Britain and argues that they were crucial to the development of the patterns of identification that West Indian migrants utilized while negotiating British society. The hostile environment in London was a shock to the migrants and their collective trauma upset the salutary perceptions they had of Britain as the "mother country". Severely limited economic opportunities within the Caribbean, wherein most black West Indians had access to employment only on the large private and internationally owned sugar and fruit plantations or bauxite mines provided a major impetus for migration to metropolitan Britain. His project explores the patterns of affiliation and radical politics which developed among Afro and Indo-Caribbean migrants as well as their colleagues and counterparts from Africa and South Asia. James grew up in Brooklyn and holds a BA in History from Vassar College.

Nathalie Pierre

Department of Black Studies
South Hall 3702
University of California, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3150 
npierre@blackstudies.ucsb.edu

Nathalie Pierre is a PhD candidate in the department of History at New York University. Her fascination with Black Studies began taking shape with the first ouster of former Haitian President Jean-Betrand Aristide. Though unclear, then, why they—immigrant Blacks—were transformed into Brooklyn pariahs, she gradually understood the root of the problem remained buried in the past. Her dissertation titled, “‘The Vessel of Independence…Must Save Itself’*: Haitian Statecraft 1803-1820”examines thehistorical development of a Black state in a period characterized by racialized slavery and turbulent revolution. Her analysis of Haitian, British, French, and U.S. diplomatic records, newspapers, trade ledgers, and maps reveal a complicated narrative that traces the transformation of formerly enslaved colonial subjects into Black monarchists and republicans. Taking cue from W.E.B. DuBois’ reflection that “Negro blood has … a message for the world,” Ms. Pierre’s scholarship seeks to unearth tools of Africana community formation at the level of statecraft.


* Henri Christophe in October 1810

2012-2013 Dissertation Scholars

Kiley Guyton Acosta

Department of Black Studies
South Hall 3702
University of California, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3150 
kacosta@blackstudies.ucsb.edu
kileyacosta@gmail.com

Kiley Acosta is a PhD candidate, ABD (all but dissertation), in Caribbean and Brazilian Literature at the University of New Mexico. She genuinely appreciates the kindness, support, and advice she has received from the faculty and staff of UCSB Black Studies, who have welcomed her with open arms. “I’m impressed not only by the quality and breadth of research and publications in Black Studies,” says Acosta, “but by the friendliness and down-to-earth nature of the people in the department, and the UCSB academic community at large.” Read more about Kiley on the Diversity Forum Article

2011-2012 Dissertation Scholars

Jessica Barros

Department of Black Studies
South Hall 3723  
University of California, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3150 
jbarros@blackstudies.ucsb.edu

Jessica Barros is a candidate for a Doctoral degree in the Department of English at St. John’s University, New York. Her dissertation, “Cape Verdean Rhetorical Discourse Strategies in Bandera,” a qualitative study that investigates literacies in bandera, a Cape Verdean feast honoring a patron saint.  Bandera rituals reflect social interactions that once existed between masters and their slaves.  These social interactions are a critical site of literacy that show how Africans used their culture as education for resisting colonial violence. Jessica’s dissertation is a multi-vocal text that centers itself in two elderly day centers and spans across generations of Cape Verdeans. As a Composition Rhetorician, Jessica brings cultural, post colonial, and ethnic studies with special emphasis on critical race theory, literacy, language, rhetoric, discourse, and pedagogy to English studies. Her research includes how hip hop, as a lingua franca, cuts across ethnic and racial divides and aligns itself with black movements for education, freedom, liberation, and equality; how hip hop’s black rhetorical strategies allow for the awakening of racial consciousness and unmasking of neo-racisms by students of diverse backgrounds; and how hip hop pedagogy prepares all students for the multimodal, multiple literacies, and critical race work of the 21st century and beyond.  Jessica earned received her MFA in Creative Writing from Emerson College and her B.A. in Political Science and English from Boston College.

Alix Chapman

Department of Black Studies
Room 3702 South Hall 
University of California, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3150 
achapman@blackstdudies.ucsb.edu

Alix Chapman is a Ph. D. candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Texas, Austin. His dissertation, Break It Down: Black Queer Performance and the Politics of Displacement in New Orleans, addresses the ways in which home, heritage, and the body are reconceptualized in the wake of crisis. Through a combination of performance ethnography and historical, and literary critique Alix explores “Sissy” Bounce, a local genre of hip hop that expresses black queer people’s sexual and gendered displacement from the traditional home. Moreover, he looks at how this public culture intersects a public sphere in which socioeconomic disaster and reconstruction determine the life chances of all black people. Pushing Cathy J. Cohen’s 2004 work, further, do the artistic acts of black queer cultural producers constitute “resistance”? If so, what meaning can be drawn from oppositional enactments that occur in contrast to communities that reinforce normative standards of race, gender, and sexuality, enactments that seek to redefine narrow, state-centered understandings of citizenship. Alix is particularly interested in Southern U.S. and Caribbean African diasporas and is deeply invested in interdisciplinary projects that bring art and politics into conversation with each other.

Rafael Mota

Department of Black Studies
Room 3702 South Hall 
University of California, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3150 
rmota@blackstudies.ucsb.edu

Rafael Mota is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Philosophy, Interpretation and Culture Program at the State University of New York, Binghamton.  His dissertation,  “Global Racial Regimes and Capitalist Accumulation on a World Scale," examines the world-historical patterns of race-making and capitalist accumulation throughout the Atlantic periphery that undergirded the rise of US hegemony during the long-twentieth century. This research explores the interactions of colonialism and liberal penality in the formation of Military-Keynesianism as the engine of world-scale capitalist accumulation and the shift of modern governance from the liberal-imperial state to a welfare-carceral state. He is particularly interested in the interactions of race, gender and sexuality in the historical formation of capitalism and social classes. Rafael earned his B.A. in Philosophy from Boston College.

 

2010-2011 Dissertation Scholars

Kevin Moseby

Department of Black Studies
Room 3702 South Hall 
University of California, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3150 
kmoseby@ucsd.edu

Kevin M. Moseby is a Dissertation Scholar in the Department of Black Studies at UCSB for the 2010-2011 academic year.  Kevin is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of California, San Diego.  His dissertation is entitled “Changing the Color of HIV Prevention: Black Community Activism, Public Health and the Biopolitics of Racial Formations in the U.S.” The central aim of his dissertation project is to analyze the changing racialization of HIV/AIDS in the United States. This research explores the dynamic experiences of black Americans as both objects of the field of HIV/AIDS prevention, as well as active subjects in the creation of knowledge within the field.  Further, it provides an account of the rise of black American visibility and of black American activism in the HIV Prevention field.  Kevin was born and raised in Arkansas and has earned a B.A. in History from Stanford University, and an M.A. in Social and Cultural Studies from the University of California, Berkeley.

LaToya Tavernier

Department of Black Studies
Room 3702 South Hall 
University of California, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3150 
latoyat@gmail.com

LaToya Asantelle Tavernier is a Dissertation Scholar in the Department of Black Studies at UCSB. LaToya is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Sociology at The Graduate Center, City University of New York (CUNY). Her dissertation, “On the Midnight Train to Georgia: Afro-Caribbeans and the New Great Migration to Atlanta,” focuses on the new (post-1990) migration of Afro-Caribbeans to Atlanta, Georgia and its relationship to the larger migrations of African American “return” migrants, and of immigrant newcomers from Asia, Africa, and Latin America, to the urban South. She is particularly interested in the intersections of race, class, gender, and immigration in the incorporation of Afro-Caribbeans, as black immigrants, into Atlanta. She earned received her Master’s degree from Queens College-CUNY in Sociology and her Bachelor’s degree from Columbia University in Psychology.